The road to residency part 6: temp visa granted

Close-up-Photo-Of-Approved-Stamp-On-Visa

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Nearly two years after I began the application process, my temporary visa has finally been granted.

Immigration took so long that my visa medical assessment expired. My migrant agent called and informed me I needed to do it again. His office scheduled it with Bupa.

It was bad enough the first time with Medibank and it was downright awful the second time around. At Medibank, I was allowed to wear my clothes throughout most of the examination, until the chest X-ray when I changed into a paper top and then right back to my clothes.

At Bupa, I had to change into the paper top at the start and wear it throughout every step of the examination. Much of that time is spent waiting in room full of men, women, and children doing the same thing. When you’re a fat woman with large breasts, wearing a paper top in a room full of strangers for a couple of hours is very uncomfortable. I was glad to leave that place and I’ll always warn future immigrants going through this process to avoid Bupa if they can.

That was in February. A couple of weeks ago, on a Friday afternoon, my migrant agent called me to inform me that my visa had been approved. He emailed me the paperwork and was very clear over the phone that I should go to him with any questions, as there is a lot of misinformation around this subject.

Reviewing the paperwork from Immigration, there was no mention of having to leave Australia and re-enter for the visa to kick in. I asked my migrant agent about it:

Ah the things people say!

Whoever said that you need to leave and re-enter to have the visa kick in is wrong. Who knows where a story like that could have come from – it is one I have never heard before.

I’ve heard it many times. Curious, isn’t it?

So, I’m currently the holder of a “Partner (Temporary) (class UK) Partner (subclass 820) visa”. Immigration really likes parentheses, it seems. In a year, this temporary visa should turn into permanent residency.

Read
The road to residency part 1: the visa medical assessment
The road to residency part 2: tricky language
The road to residency part 3: the relationship
The road to residency part 4: all the extras
The road to residency part 5: death and taxes
The road to residency part 6: temp visa granted
The road to residency part 7: more waiting
The road to residency part 8: permanent residencyg

Comments

comments

4 Comments

  1. Congratulations- you’re getting there!

    Surprised that the migrant agent had NEVER heard of the exit/re-enter requirement, but I supposed if he is only working with people who are applying from within Australia, he never would have encountered it firsthand. (I had to leave and return because I had begun my application from outside Australia, and then entered Australia on a Visitor’s Visa).

    • Cosette Paneque

      Yes, I imagine the process is different if you apply onshore versus offshore, not to mention that it feels like the requirements change every other day. I’m so glad it’s over (for now).

  2. Congratulations.
    I’m horrified to hear how the medical exam at Bupa was done – that sounds terrible.

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